Interviews

The Glorious Sons

Interview With Brett Emmons of The Glorious Sons

The album Young Beauties and Fools by The Glorious Sons hit my radar last year and has been on repeat ever since. It's a full album - meaning it has all kinds of songs but still sounds like it's from one band. These guys play…
Will Vs. The Future - Interview With Tim McKeon

Interview With Tim McKeon, Co-Creator of Odd Squad + Will Vs. The Future

Tim McKeon - Co-Creator of Odd Squad + Will Vs. The FutureI used to be an ambassador for PBS KIDS and the only reason I stopped is because my son is now a teenager in high school. Of course, that doesn't stop us from watching PBS KIDS shows. But working with that group afforded me all kinds of amazing opportunities, including meeting the creators of many of their shows. I was thrilled when Tim McKeon, who I met when Odd Squad launched, called and wanted to talk about his new show that is being featured in the Amazon Pilot Season. We chatted about Will Vs. The Future, his journey in the biz, and his favorite pastime outside of television. (Hint: it's delicious.)

Interview with Tim McKeon about Will Vs. The Future


How did you get into kid's programming? Honestly, I fell into it. I'm from Massachusetts and I went west for TV. I mean, I did plays in high school and college but I really wanted to get into TV. I like how collaborative it is. I started looking for sitcoms just like everyone else does in LA. But my first job was on a children's show and I loved it. You can do weird, crazy stuff and be passionate about what you are doing and have the most fun. Kids are the BEST super fans. So, you went from Gravity Falls to Adventure Time to Odd Squad. How different was all that? Odd Squad was the one that was really different. Because it was educational show, there were all these parameters to it. But I love the idea of secretly teaching kids within a show that was action-packed. But as far as my career, each show informed the next, so it's been a great learning experience. Tell me about your new show, Will Vs. The Future. A lot of people are saying that it's like the Terminator, but for kids. I hope that isn't off putting? Comedy in the kid’s space can be a little difficult and there certainly isn't much in the way of sci-fi. Will is a smart, thoughtful middle school kid, struggling with life a bit - and then the Warrior comes back to destroy him because in the future he actually destroys the world. Will convinces her not to kill him and they team up to change the future. There's a lot of Buffy flavor to it and time travel, including a big wink to Back To The Future because Biff (Thomas F. Wilson) plays the school principal on the show. That was a fantastic choice. We’re really trying to have something that a family can watch together - and enjoy - since there is such a gap in those types of shows at this age range. And the great thing for Will is that he's exploring the themes of growing up and finding yourself, but using this sci-fi angle as a vehicle to make it fun.
Together Pangea

Interview with Together Pangea’s Danny: Growing Up But Still Having Fun

The band Together Pangea recently released their fourth LP, Bulls and Roosters, and for those paying attention - it sounds a bit different. Perhaps a little less punk and maybe more straight-up rock and roll? I chatted with bassist Danny Bengston about their evolution and all the venues they have played in Denver.
Where does the name come from? Pangea, like the continent? Yeah, we were originally called just that. But when we were signed, the label made us change the name because there were so many trademarks on just that word. At the time, we had created a MySpace page called "togetherPANGEA" for the same reason - so many pangeas. But that's what we went with for the name change. You have been together for almost a decade, how have you changed over the years? We didn't used to use tuners, so we always played out of tune (laughs). No, honestly, in the past all we wanted to do is have fun and party. We liked to play but didn't care how we sounded. But other people started to care, which forced us to care. It's been about growing up and taking it more seriously. I do feel lucky that I still get do something I love with my friends, though.

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